Winston churchill essay painting

Eisenhower George W. Bush John F. This is the editorial account for Westminster College news team. Please feel free to get in touch if you have any questions or comments. The Honorable James E. Westminster Success Stories: Class of Four Faculty Members Approved for Tenure. Facebook 0 Tweet 0 Pin 0. Westminster College YouTube Channel. Recent Posts Popular Posts. Westminster Success Stories: Class of 1 Aug, Faculty and Staff. Painting as a Pastime ended with eighteen prints of his paintings. Churchill was not a great artist or the colors in my edition have faded , but a surprisingly good one.

It's rewarding to discover a different view of someone you thought you knew. View all 4 comments. One of the benefits of being a collector of printed books is the opportunity to own a treasure such as this. It's slight and will be squeezed by heavier tomes, much as a tiny home between two office buildings. But the joy of life that is inside the pages is more than enough to make it special. Churchill has brought a smile to my face many a time via his writings.


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Here he states his wonder at being able to pick up a paintbrush as one of his pursuits along with others, such as saving the world. There ar One of the benefits of being a collector of printed books is the opportunity to own a treasure such as this. There are also colour plates of Churchill's paintings, with his blues and purples especially vibrant.

As someone who has difficulty drawing a circle, I admire anyone with an artistic soul. This is also a nice book for a corporate wake-up call, as Churchill broaches the subject of workaholics and the need to have other hobbies to keep the mind engaged but away from the daily grind. My crayons are waiting for me. View 1 comment. Jan 12, Greg rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Everyone.

Winston Churchill's Paintings: Great Statesman, Surprisingly Good Artist | Open Culture

In the edition I have, thirty two pages of Painting as a Pastime are from Winston Churchill's pen. The other pages are from his brush, images of his paintings, which are pretty competent, and are what I'd say are close to the Bloomsbury School. This is a great little book by a great mind. I broke into a smile a lot reading Painting as a Pastime.

A Few Notes on The Context

Churchill approached painting as he would a battle. I don't mean he will 'paint them on the beaches'. He states "One begins to see, for instance, t In the edition I have, thirty two pages of Painting as a Pastime are from Winston Churchill's pen. He states "One begins to see, for instance, that painting a picture is like fighting a battle; and trying to paint a picture is, I suppose, like trying fight a battle.

It is, if anything, more exciting than fighting it successfully. But the principle is the same".

And nobody gets hurt. If only armies faced off with easels instead of weapons. Churchill's personal nature had him half way there to being a good painter before he ever started picking up the brushes. Ol' Winston instinctively knew one thing, be decisive with that brush, be confident and stand your ground and don't give up. Painting as a Pastime is eloquently and elegantly written, and in a positive spirit.

Aug 11, PJ Wenzel rated it it was amazing. One of my favorite little books of the year. As soon as I finished it I started reading it again, looking for my favorite turns of phrases. I hesitate to list this short tome as a book read, but it is a powerful meditation on one of life's most significant topics from one of the greatest writers of the 20th century.

Churchill's staggering influence often makes him seem a remote figure, and modern tellings of his life too often deify his actions. But reading this book you'll hear his real voice. Afraid of being mocked, worried about what comes next, exhausted from his struggles, yet still passionate to keep pushing on and seeking to I hesitate to list this short tome as a book read, but it is a powerful meditation on one of life's most significant topics from one of the greatest writers of the 20th century.

Afraid of being mocked, worried about what comes next, exhausted from his struggles, yet still passionate to keep pushing on and seeking to suck more from the marrow of life. There are many gorgeous phrases in this book. As an inveterate scribbler in the margins I wanted to mark them all, and yet felt the pull of the pen to hold back and leave the text untouched so others can enjoy this book in its pure form.

Essentials

The text ostensibly is about Churchill's late in life discovery of painting as a pastime. But why this book exists, and why so many non-painters have recommended it, is because it is really about how to manage a career where your passion and profession are the same. That may seem like an indulgent challenge when so many work jobs they can't stand and are lectured nightly to 'just follow your passion'.

But it's a real issue. As Winston notes early on, strain the mind in one direction during the day and without some form of adequate rest which neither booze nor unconsciousness can quite fill and it won't quite rebound in the right way the next day.

Painting as a Pastime, by Winston Churchill

Churchill discovered that at much greater pressure at At 31 I feel I also have. I love my job and life, without question, but I feel I need some outlet to regularly reset beyond what I have access to. Whether painting is quite right for me I'm not sure.

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But that there needs to be something -having read this book- I feel no doubt is right. I remember soon after beginning full time work asking my friends 'What do you do each night? It was a genuine question. Of the mere precious few hours between coming home and the necessary movement towards sleep , there are only so few things that can be done, so little distance put between you and the things you flee. But regardless of the verdict of the previous day you need to accept that deadline, move willingly towards unconsciousness and prepare for another vault into the forge.

When thought of this way, the entire process is utterly bizzare, and even a few days eaked out over short holidays or long weekends makes little more sense. What exactly then do you do during this time? What helps escape the past, salve the return and make meaningful the space inbetween? These are some of the most important and unasked and unanswered questions of our time.

This is the rare book which tries to go beyond the utilitarian ideal and talk to this vital topic. For that reason it goes straight to my must read and most treasured pile. Jun 05, Rick Shrader added it. I have owned this book for a while but was reminded of it in reading a graduation speech. Yet a little known fact is that he was an avid painter, not beginning the hobby until forty years of age, but continuing the rest of his life. In all he painted over canvases, many of which were exhibited at the British Royal Academy.

Churchill: His unique vision of the world

A man can wear out a particular part of his mind by continually using it and tiring it, just in the same way as he can wear out the elbows of his coat. There is, however, this difference between the living cells of the brain and inanimate articles: one cannot mend the frayed elbows of a coat by rubbing the sleeves or shoulders; but the tired parts of the mind can be rested and strengthened, mot merely by rest, but by using other parts.

It is not enough merely to switch off the lights which play upon the main ordinary field of interest; a new field of interest must be illuminated. If it has been weighing and measuring, it goes on weighing and measuring. If it has been worrying, it goes on worrying.