Annenberg case studies in science education

Greg — Grade 6 Greg, a sixth-grade student teacher, is designing hands-on, minds-on science activities for his class.

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Paul — Grade 6 Paul, a sixth-grade science teacher, wants to involve his students in the minds-on components of science tasks. Raquel — Grade 7 Raquel, a seventh-grade teacher, is increasing the involvement of girls and students of color in science. Pat — Grade 8 Pat, an eighth-grade life sciences teacher, is working to bring focus to inquiry-oriented science activities. Jeff — Grade 6 Jeff, a sixth-grade student teacher, is exploring problem-centered learning with his students.

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Mike — Grade 7 Mike, a veteran seventh-grade teacher, is working to involve girls more in science and strengthen their self-confidence. Audrey, Year One — Grade 8 Audrey, a social studies teacher who is teaching eighth-grade science for the first time, is developing an approach to science that empowers students.

Audrey, Year Two — Grade 7 Audrey, in her second year of teaching science, is helping her seventh-grade students develop critical thinking skills. All rights reserved. Legal Policy. Teacher resources and professional development across the curriculum Teacher professional development and classroom resources across the curriculum. About Us Video Series Prof. These case studies take science education reform to a personal level, where individuals struggle to make changes that matter.

Follow Donna, Mike, Audrey, and other science teachers as they work to improve one aspect of their teaching. Each case follows a single teacher over the course of a year and is divided into three modules: the teacher's background and the problem he or she chooses to address, the chosen approach and implementation, and the outcome with assessment by the teacher and his or her advisor. Please visit our Discontinued Series page for contact information for the series producer.

Please note that the series producer may not be distributing the series if rights to the original material was not able be renewed. ISBN: X. A video library for K-8 science teachers; 25 half-hour video programs and guides These case studies take science education reform to a personal level, where individuals struggle to make changes that matter. Seventh-graders investigate kidney structure. Explain how specific images e. Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area. Use text features and search tools e. Use information gained from illustrations e. Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text e. Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area. Describe the overall structure e. Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively e. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text. Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

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Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.

Compare and contrast the overall structure e. Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent. Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point s.

Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text e. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings. Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.

Integrate information presented in different media or formats e. Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6—8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text e.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas. Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

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Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts. Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.

Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events e. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept.


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Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums e. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6—8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone e. Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums e. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

Analyze seminal U. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9—10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text e. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats e.

Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.

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Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy e. Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11—CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

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Bringing Case Studies to the Classroom

Skills Critical Thinking. Grades This grade range is based on learning appropriateness and doesn't take into account privacy.

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